Individually smarter, collectively dumber?

8 12 2009

In my first corporate job back in Brazil, I was part of a large cohort of interns who end up all being hired together. We were young and well-connected, and always on top of everything that was happening in the company, from official stuff to the proverbial grapevine telegraph. Rumour conversations used to start like this: “I’ve heard from 3 different sources that…” My pal Alexandre Guimaraes used to joke that none of us had 3 different sources as we all shared the same connections.

Likewise, I often hear from my Twitter fellows that their RSS feed reader is now abandoned, as most of the interesting online things they find now comes from their tweeps. A quick experiment seems to confirm that trend. Here are the results of a Twitter search for “twitter feed reader“:

Search results for "twitter feed reader"

Search results for "twitter feed reader"

In my recent re-read of The Wisdom of Crowds, the following excerpt called my attention (highlight is mine):

(…) the more influence a group’s members exert on each other, and the more personal contact they have with each other, the less likely it is that the group’s decisions will be wise ones. The more influence we exert on each other, the more likely it is that we will believe the same things and make the same mistakes. That means it’s possible that we could become individually smarter but collectively dumber.

The first time I read that was many years before Twitter even existed, so it didn’t mean much to me. Now I can relate: I do feel that Twitter is making me individually smarter, as I can quickly consume a whole lot of info from news sources, geeks, NBA players, celebrities, friends and others. I find the Twitscoop cloud in TweetDeck a particularly good way to find what’s going on around the globe right now.

Twitscoop cloud

I used to see that cloud as a visualization of our collective intelligence. But perhaps that cloud is actually something much more humbling: the visualization of our own echo chamber, our herd’s brain. By being so intensely connected, we may be losing one of the most basic conditions identified by Surowiecki’s for a crowd to be wise: independence (the other 2 are diversity and decentralization).

Should we all stop using Twitter and Facebook now? Of course not. But maybe we should invest a bit more of our time going after the unusual, the unpopular, the offline, the old and the out-of-fashion. The core is boring, and the fringe is where real innovation and change tend to appear first.

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6 responses

8 12 2009
Archimedes Trajano

Actually I use many of the technologies out there for brain food.

Twitter and StumbleUpon shares are good for point to point. These are faster than e-mail and less invasive than instant messaging.

StumbleUpon/RSS feeds/Last.fm are good for personalized results. I usually go through these until I get bored with “myself”.

Then there is movies, TV and radio (yes TV and radio, no matter how mind numbing most of things out there are, it is good to know what “the masses” have to deal with once in a while, either to broaden your scope so you are not in your personal (but ideal world), or to laugh/demean/etc at the mass’ expense (which I usually do when I see stuff like Fox news)

8 12 2009
Juanny Cinco

One of my favorite lyrics that describes Twitter.

We are the angry mob
We read the papers everyday day
We like who like
We hate who we hate
But we’re also easily swayed

🙂

10 12 2009
benedictedelachanal

collectively dumber, that seems to be true no matter what communication technologies is used.

10 12 2009
Aaron

Hey Archie! I may need to get TV and radio back to the mix. I only watch TV these days to catch NBA games. And radio is limited to iPhone’s TuneWiki, mostly for music.

Juanny, I love Kaiser Chief’s Angry Mob’s video (NSFW). Didn’t know you were a fan.

BĂ©nĂ©, I consider myself both smarter and lucky for following your blog (your December project is so cool) 🙂 .

15 09 2010
A Skewed Web: Innovation is in the outskirts of social media « The bamboo raft

[…] one problem–information overload–but exacerbated another one: we were all getting individually smarter, but collectively dumber. By letting the majority or the loud mouths dictate what was relevant, we ended up with a giant […]

3 09 2011
A Skewed Web: Innovation is in the outskirts of social media | Biznology

[…] one problem–information overload–but exacerbated another one: we were all getting individually smarter, but collectively dumber. By letting the majority or the loud mouths dictate what was relevant, we ended up with a giant […]

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